TOBACCO / VAPING

 
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Every day, about 2,000 young people under age 18 smoke their first cigarette, and more than 300 become daily cigarette smokers.

Consequences

New Jersey law states: A PERSON WHO SELLS OR OFFERS A TOBACCO PRODUCT TO A PERSON UNDER 21 YEARS OF AGE SHALL PAY A PENALTY OF UP TO $1,000 AND MAY BE SUBJECT TO A LICENSE SUSPENSION OR REVOCATION

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In addition to cancer, smoking causes lung diseases such as chronic bronchitis and emphysema, and it has been found to exacerbate asthma symptoms in adults and children.

Teens who smoke are three times more likely than nonsmokers to use alcohol, eight times more likely to use marijuana, and 22 times more likely to use cocaine. Smoking is associated with a host of other risky behaviors, such as fighting and engaging in unprotected sex.


Until about age 25, the brain is still growing. Each time a new memory is created or a new skill is learned, stronger connections – or synapses – are built between brain cells. Young people's brains build synapses faster than adult brains. Because addiction is a form of learning, adolescents can get addicted more easily than adults. The nicotine in e-cigarettes and other tobacco products can also prime the adolescent brain for addiction to other drugs such as cocaine.

Signs of Use & Withdrawal

Craving cigarettes, feeling sad or irritable, or trouble sleeping are some common symptoms. Some people say it feels like a mild case of the flu.

When you quit vaping, your body and brain must get used to going without nicotine. This is called nicotine withdrawal. The side effects of nicotine withdrawal can be uncomfortable and can trigger cravings for nicotine. Common nicotine withdrawal symptoms include:

Feeling irritable, restless, or jittery

Having headaches

Increased sweating

Feeling sad or down

Feeling anxious

Feeling tired or groggy

Having trouble thinking clearly or concentrating

Having trouble sleeping

Feeling hungry

Having intense cravings for e-cigarettes

 

What to do at home

Tips to Keep a Smoke-free Home:

Never smoke inside your home, even when it's cold outside. Smoking indoors one time is enough to contaminate the rest of the house, even if you're in a room with the doors closed.

Create a comfortable place to smoke outdoors for both yourself and any visitors who smoke.

Keeping an umbrella near the door will help encourage you to go outside to smoke even when the weather is bad.

Let guests know that your house is smoke free and show them to a child-free area where they can smoke if they need to do so.

Consider posting a sign to remind visitors that there is no smoking in your house.


WHAT WE OFFER:

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DON’T GET VAPED IN

Initiative aimed to equip educators, parents, and youth with knowledge about vaping and the ability to identify both the devices themselves and signs that youth may be using them.

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INCORRUPTIBLE.US

Incorruptible.us is a program that brings together motivated and creative teens to take a stand against the use of Tobacco in New Jersey.

Our purpose includes setting up new groups or partnering with already existing groups and focusing on the prevention and cessation of tobacco use among our youth ages 13-18.